Red Dot Finder

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So, in case you don’t already know, the Orion EON 110mm ED refractor does not come with any extras.  Unless you count the front element cover, ring clamps, and the case (and I don’t), you will need to budget appropriately for your own dovetail rails, finder scope, diagonal, and eyepieces.

For my money, nothing beats the simplicity and minuscule profile of a red dot finder, but getting one attached to a telescope is never a straightforward affair.  I’ve already come to the conclusion that -notwithstanding Orion’s impressive design and construction efforts- nothing in astronomy is ever configured to do what you want right out of the box.  It seems no matter how many threaded holes Orion thoughtfully included in the stock configuration, there just aren’t enough, or they are in the wrong location to do what I want.  So it’s time to break out the tap and die set.

What you see here is the end result of three weeks of brainstorming and trial & error.  At the end of the day, all the dovetail and quick-disconnect pipe dreams ended up in the parts bag, and I settled on a simple, chamfered aluminum mounting plate, screwed to the outside of the ring clamp closest to the focuser.  Rock solid, low-profile, and unobtrusive.